In costume for Darren Banks & Torsten Burns' performance at Krowswork. Fall 2016.  They let me wear what I wanted. Modified pants and dress. Mask made from scratch.  I gave the pants to Maurissa Dorn when she and Hannah Levy's performed to close out my own installation at Krowswork, 2017.

In costume for Darren Banks & Torsten Burns' performance at Krowswork. Fall 2016.  They let me wear what I wanted. Modified pants and dress. Mask made from scratch.

I gave the pants to Maurissa Dorn when she and Hannah Levy's performed to close out my own installation at Krowswork, 2017.

A bit more about Dym Products.

For many years, instead of an artist website under my name, my work was filtered through or re-directed by DymProducts.com. I used Dym Products as an informal pseudonym, or a disguise, since the beginning of the 21st century, and I enjoyed organizing my public face as an awkward, searching, unresolved corporation.

"In 2013, Dym transformed her long-held alter ego, Dym Products, into an actual corporation. Using business strategy, she focuses on the strange human traits of liking to make and to buy stuff, and to generate shocking volumes of toxins and trash."

This corporation had different divisions that took on different subjects, although there was always interweaving of content and themes. On DymProducts.com, I don't think I made this particularly clear. The structure allowed me to do some things, and made others difficult.

One good reason I can think of, now, that I chose corporate divisions was because it allowed me to sort work by projects and intent. Trying to organize an official artist website in the past, I'd get bogged down in categories and communication. And a dislike for arranging the work like a slideshow, a prevailing metaphor of artist websites. 

Suddenly, it's 2018 and websites behave differently, so projects flow directly into project "boxes". And, with much of the work now several or many years old, I'm happy to extract parts of projects or series and re-categorize them with similar things (see Omitted Projects for the clearest example). I trained as a painter, and sometimes painting is conceptual art.

About

Miriam Dym is an artist and self-taught systems thinker with a drawing based practice. She often uses strategies and tools from design, engineering, and business. Dym prefers hybrid and disruptive objects that avoid clear categorization, including functional items treated as art (e.g., not used for their function) and art made so that it might have functionality. For some projects, Dym incorporates live performances, typically enacting manufacturing processes in public, sometimes with viewer interaction.

Dym has shown at museums and galleries in the US and abroad, including the Brooklyn Museum of Art and SFMOMA, which has one of her pieces in the permanent collection, Susanne Vielmetter, PØST-LA, and Pierogi. Residencies include The Watermill (Long Island, New York), Cité des Arts (Paris), Kala Art Institute (Berkeley) and Stanford University Digital Art Center. Dym is a 2017 LS&Co Sustainability grant recipient. In 2018, several works Dym created in the mid-1990s years will be in "Contraption" at the Contemporary Jewish Museum—thrillingly, alongside Rube Goldberg, Bella Feldman, and other very cool artists.

 

 
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